Can Attack Helicopters Save UN Peacekeeping?

Global Peace Operations Review Can Attach Helicopters Save UN Peacekeeping? By James Traub 28th September 2015 The author analyzes the importance of the World Leaders’ Summit on Peacekeeping, and whether or not force and increased capabilities can enough be alone to save United Nations Peace Operations from experiencing a crisis that is worse than usual. He also comments on the recommendations of the HIPPO-report that UN peacekeeping missions should not undertake military counter-terrorism operations, and argues that while this is a valid idea – it does little to help missions deal with the realities they currently face. Read more here. The article was also published in Foreign...

Community Engagement for Protection

Joint NGO Briefing Note on Community Engagement for Protection Recommendations on the Implementation of the HIPPO Report Community Engagement for Protection Recommendations on the implementation of the HIPPO Report Civilians are the main stakeholders of UN peace operations. They have the most to gain from their successes and the most to lose from their failures. Whilst community engagement was mentioned in the High-Level Independent Panel on Peace Operations (HIPPO) report and in the subsequent Secretary-General’s Plan of Action, it has yet to go beyond mere rhetoric. While engaging with communities has been a priority for peace operations since 2010, this significant gap between rhetoric and implementation must be addressed. A greater effort needs to be made to ensure engagement with civilians is actually happening on the ground. A number of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) that work on protection of civilians, including Civilians in Conflict, FIDH, the Global Centre for R2P, IRC, Nonviolent Peaceforce, Oxfam, PAX, Refugees International and World Vision, provide the following recommendations on how to operationalize community engagement, which is further elaborated in the document: community engagement should be front and center in all political and protection strategies and leadership Terms of reference (TORs); it needs to build further upon existing, locally-led initiatives; all peace operations should have Community Liaison Assistants (50% men – 50% women); the engagement needs to happen in a safe and respectful manner. Download NGO Briefing...

From HIPPO to SG Legacy: What Prospects for UN Peace Operations Reform?

The Global Observatory From HIPPO to SG Legacy: What Prospects for UN Peace Operations Reform? By Arthur Boutellis 24th September 2015 Almost three months after the High-Level Independent Panel on Peace Operations (HIPPO) released its 111-page report—and put forward over 100 recommendations—the UN Secretary-General (SG) released its own 28-page report earlier this month outlining his agenda and “priorities and key actions” to move the panel’s recommendations forward between now and the end of 2016, when his second and last term ends. Which HIPPO recommendations did the Secretary-General endorse (or not endorse), and why? How can we ensure that the spirit of the report—together with the other global reviews such as the ones of the UN peacebuilding architecture and of the implementation of UN resolution 1325—are carefully considered by the membership and lead to meaningful reform that will help make UN peace operations “fit for purpose?”...

How can the UN move towards more people-centered peace operations?

Global Peace Operations Review, Center for International Cooperation (CIC) How can the UN move towards more people-centered peace operations? By John Karlsrud 23rd September 2015 A slew of recent reviews, such as the high level panel on UN peace operations report (HIPPO report), the 2015 review of the UN peacebuilding architecture and the 2030 agenda for sustainable development, have all put people at the front and center of the international community’s efforts to bring about peace, security and development. These reports focus on the need for responsive, inclusive, participatory and representative political settlements to achieve sustained peace. This follows increasing criticism that the UN and other international peacebuilders are more focused on placating national elites and their masters at headquarters in New York, Brussels and Washington, rather than the people they are mandated to protect. Séverine Autessere and other scholars argue that international peacebuilders are more intent on following their professional prescripts than responding to local needs, focusing on tangible outputs such as buildings, institutions, laws and technical assistance, resulting in a top-down approach. These critics argue that the UN should instead focus on helping establish more accountable, inclusive and responsive states that can respond to the needs and views of the people. These need to be articulated by the people through formal, as well as informal political institutions. To really help people and the states they live in, UN peace operations must respond to the challenges facing these states of fragility by fostering more inclusive and responsive societies. Read...
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