The UN Security Council in the 21st Century

Related Research The UN Security Council in the 21st Century  By Sebastian von Einsiedel, David M. Malone, and Bruno Stagno Ugarte, editors After grappling for two decades with the realities of the post–Cold War era, the UN Security Council must now meet the challenges of a resurgence of great power rivalry. Reflecting this new environment, The UN Security Council in the 21st Century provides a comprehensive view of the council’s internal dynamics, its role and relevance in world politics, and its performance in addressing today’s major security challenges. View the book here.   <...

Enhancing U.S. Support for Peace Operations in Africa

Related Research Enhancing U.S. Support for Peace Operations in Africa By Paul D. Williams The number of UN peacekeepers is at a record high, with nearly 110,000 uniformed deployed “blue helmets” worldwide, most of them in Africa. But the status quo is “untenable,” warns Paul D. Williams, author and associate professor of international affairs at George Washington University, in a new Council Special Report, Enhancing U.S. Support for Peace Operations in Africa. Unrealistic mandates, unsustainable supplies of personnel, hostile host governments, and mission creep have undermined peace operations, Williams writes. “Given the growing interest in fostering a stable and prosperous Africa, the United States should wield its political influence to address these challenges.” Download report here   <...

The Future of African Peace Operations: Time to Adjust the Operational Design

Related Research The Future of African Peace Operations: Time to Adjust the Operational Design By Walter Lotze In 2015, the African Standby Force (ASF), a key component of the African Peace and Security Architecture (APSA) is meant to reach full operational capability. More than a decade ago, in line with the growing political ambitions of African states to play a stronger role in relation to peace and security on the continent, African Union (AU) members decided to establish their own rapidly deployable, multi-dimensional peace operations capability. Despite significant progress attained the development of the ASF has been uneven over the course of the past decade. Unsatisfied with these delays, African states through the African Union (AU) Assembly in 2013 mandated the establishment of the African Capacity for Immediate Response to Crises (ACIRC), intended to provide the AU with a quick reaction force, as a temporary stop-gap until the ASF was ready. Neither the ASF nor the ACIRC however will be able to provide Africa sufficiently with the peace support operations capabilities it requires. What is needed therefore is an adjustment of the operational design for African peace support operations which better corresponds to the realities and needs of the African continent. Download report here <...

Saving Strangers and Neighbors: Advancing UN-AU Cooperation on Peace Operations

Related Research Saving Strangers and Neighbors: Advancing UN-AU Cooperation on Peace Operations By Paul D. Williams and Solomon Dersso (New York: International Peace Institute, February 2015) The United Nations and African Union now deploy a record number of peacekeepers in Africa. In the past two years, the relationship between the two institutions has deepened, as new AU missions in Mali and the Central African Republic have transitioned into UN peacekeeping operations and ongoing missions in Somali and South Sudan have expanded considerably. Yet the UN-AU relationship faces persistent challenges and dilemmas. As African-led peace operations include mandates for more offensive operations, how can the UN and AU ensure that their visions for peace operations are complementary and not contradictory? Given the lack of funding from AU member states, what kind of financial support should the UN provide to missions that it has authorized but does not lead? This new IPI report offers an overview of the evolution of the UN-AU partnership on peace operations since 2005 and provides an analysis of UN-AU cooperation in recent African crises, including Mali, Somalia, the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and South Sudan. It examines the major outstanding challenges in the relationship between the UN and AU and suggests that the two institutions need to intensify efforts to streamline decision making and expand the nascent joint framework for enhanced partnership in peace and security. The authors offer a number of specific recommendations for strengthening the partnership in peace operations, including the following: The UN Security Council and AU Peace and Security Council should establish a mechanism for financing UN-authorized AU...

Strategic Options for the Future of African Peace Operations 2015–2025

Related Research Strategic Options for the Future of African Peace Operations 2015–2025 By Cedric de Coning, Linnéa Gelot and John Karlsrud Increasingly complex security environments are placing high demands on African peace operations, and complicating efforts at long-term peace- and statebuilding. From the experiences of the African Union (AU) and the sub-regions over the last decade, an African model of peace operations has emerged that is at odds with the mission scenarios and multi-dimensional assumptions that underpinned the original framework of the African Standby Force (ASF). Download report here   <...
Bitnami