Deploying Combined Teams: Lessons Learned from Operational Partnerships in UN Peacekeeping

Related Research Deploying Combined Teams: Lessons Learned from Operational Partnerships in UN Peacekeeping By Donald C. F. Daniel, Paul D. Williams, and Adam C. Smith The 12th Report in the Providing for Peacekeeping series Only fifteen United Nations’ member states provide more than 60 percent of the 104,000 UN uniformed personnel deployed worldwide. How can a more equitable sharing of the global peacekeeping burden be produced that generates new capabilities for UN operations? Operational partnerships are one potentially useful mechanism to further this agenda. They are partnerships that occur when military units from two or more countries combine to deploy as part of a peacekeeping operation. This report assesses the major benefits and challenges of these partnerships for UN peace operations at both the political and operational levels. The report begins by providing an overview of the different varieties of partnerships in contemporary UN peace operations and describes the major patterns apparent in a new database of forty-one operational partnerships from 2004 to 2014. It presents case studies of two UN missions that exhibit the full range of operational partnerships: the UN Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) and the UN Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP). The authors explore why some UN member states engage in operational partnerships or might do so in the future, arguing that the reasons include a wide range of both mission-specific concerns and broader political and security-related reasons. Download the report here <...

The Oxford Handbook of United Nations Peacekeeping Operations, edited by Joachim Koops, Norrie MacQueen, Thierry Tardy, and Paul D. Williams

Related Research The Oxford Handbook of United Nations Peacekeeping Operations Edited by Joachim Koops, Norrie MacQueen, Thierry Tardy, and Paul D. Williams The Oxford Handbook of United Nations Peacekeeping Operations provides an innovative, authoritative, and accessible examination and critique of all 67 United Nations peacekeeping operations launched between 1948 and 2013. l Since the late 1940s, but particularly since the end of the cold war, peacekeeping has been the most visible and one of the most important activities of the United Nations and a significant part of global security governance and conflict management. The volume offers a chapter-by-chapter chronological analysis, designed to provide a comprehensive overview that highlights the evolution, changing nature and overall impact of UN peacekeeping. It also includes a collection of thematic chapters that examine key issues such as major trends of peace operations, the link between peacekeeping, humanitarian interventions and the responsibility to protect, peacekeeping and international law, the UN’s inter-organizational partnerships and how to evaluate success or failure. l This handbook brings together leading scholars and senior practitioners in order to provide a comprehensive assessment of the successes, failures and lessons learned of UN peacekeeping since 1948. This is a unique reference book for scholars and practitioners working in the field of international relations, international security, peacekeeping and global governance. View book here <...

Europe’s Return to UN Peacekeeping in Africa? Lessons from Mali

Related Research Europe’s Return to UN Peacekeeping in Africa? Lessons from Mali By John Karlsrud and Adam C. Smith The 11th Report in the Providing for Peacekeeping series In a break from recent tradition, European member states are currently contributing significant military capabilities to a United Nations (UN) peacekeeping operation in Africa. Europeans are providing more than 1,000 troops to the UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) by staffing a wide range of operations including an intelligence fusion cell, transport and attack aircraft, and special forces. Yet for European troop-contributing countries (TCCs) that have spent several years working in North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) operations in Afghanistan, participating in a UN mission has been a process of learning and adaptation. For the UN, the contributions of key capabilities by European countries have pushed the UN system to adjust to the higher expectations of the new European TCCs, which has proved difficult in Mali’s complicated operating environment and political situation. The report examines this complex relationship and shows the challenges and opportunities for both the UN and its European member states participating in MINUSMA. In terms of challenges, the report identifies obstacles facing European TCCs as they adapt to the UN peacekeeping system, the domestic political concerns of European TCCs, and the need for increased partnership among TCCs within the mission. In terms of opportunities, the report finds the potential of European military contributions to strengthen UN peacekeeping operations facing capability constraints and the UN’s ability to learn and adjust to increasingly asymmetric threat environments, as it responds to the needs of European TCCs. Download the report here....

Enhancing U.S. Support for Peace Operations in Africa

Related Research Enhancing U.S. Support for Peace Operations in Africa By Paul D. Williams The number of UN peacekeepers is at a record high, with nearly 110,000 uniformed deployed “blue helmets” worldwide, most of them in Africa. But the status quo is “untenable,” warns Paul D. Williams, author and associate professor of international affairs at George Washington University, in a new Council Special Report, Enhancing U.S. Support for Peace Operations in Africa. Unrealistic mandates, unsustainable supplies of personnel, hostile host governments, and mission creep have undermined peace operations, Williams writes. “Given the growing interest in fostering a stable and prosperous Africa, the United States should wield its political influence to address these challenges.” Download report here   <...

The Future of African Peace Operations: Time to Adjust the Operational Design

Related Research The Future of African Peace Operations: Time to Adjust the Operational Design By Walter Lotze In 2015, the African Standby Force (ASF), a key component of the African Peace and Security Architecture (APSA) is meant to reach full operational capability. More than a decade ago, in line with the growing political ambitions of African states to play a stronger role in relation to peace and security on the continent, African Union (AU) members decided to establish their own rapidly deployable, multi-dimensional peace operations capability. Despite significant progress attained the development of the ASF has been uneven over the course of the past decade. Unsatisfied with these delays, African states through the African Union (AU) Assembly in 2013 mandated the establishment of the African Capacity for Immediate Response to Crises (ACIRC), intended to provide the AU with a quick reaction force, as a temporary stop-gap until the ASF was ready. Neither the ASF nor the ACIRC however will be able to provide Africa sufficiently with the peace support operations capabilities it requires. What is needed therefore is an adjustment of the operational design for African peace support operations which better corresponds to the realities and needs of the African continent. Download report here <...
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