Prioritizing the Protection of Civilians in UN Peace Operations: Analyzing the Recommendations of the HIPPO Report

Related Research Prioritizing the Protection of Civilians in UN Peace Operations: Analyzing the Recommendations of the HIPPO Report By Aditi Gorur and Lisa Sharand Despite rhetoric and mandates that identify the protection of civilians as one of the highest priorities for U.N. peace operations, protection is often not treated as a priority on the ground. The report of the High-Level Independent Panel on U.N. Peace Operations (HIPPO), released in June 2015, observed a growing gap between what is expected of peace operations and what they have delivered – particularly in the area of protection. This report identifies and analyzes strategic-level recommendations in the HIPPO report that are critical to create conducive conditions for missions to prioritize the protection of civilians. These include the adoption of phased and sequenced mandates, the development of political strategies, the enhancement of mission planning and analysis, and the timely deployment of military, police, and civilian capacities. The report draws on research at U.N. headquarters and in the field to offer recommendations for the consideration of peace operations stakeholders, including U.N. member states, the U.N. Security Council, and the U.N. Secretariat, in order to prioritize the protection of civilians in peace operations. Download report here <...

Managing Change at the UN – Lessons from Recent Initiatives

Related Research Managing Change at the UN – Lessons from Recent Initiatives By Francesco Mancini As the United Nations celebrates is seventieth anniversary, the organization faces growing systemic stresses placed on it by emerging global challenges and rapidly shifting political and security dynamics. Such challenges have sparked a renewed interest in reform. The latest report by IPI examines past initiatives for change within the UN, as well as obstacles to reforms and their implementation. The report illustrates examples of successful processes of institutional transformation and highlights six waves of UN reform that have occurred since the end of the Cold War, including Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s Change Plan of 2011. By presenting research on how reforms were managed in the past and the reasons for their success or failure, the report detects the challenges and opportunities for effectively managing change at the UN. This is particularly relevant at a time when the system has undergone a series of major policy reviews that have produced a host of recommendations for reform. The report argues for a model of continuous improvement, rather than one specific institutional change or new process, and offers a number of recommendations to manage reform effectively at the UN: Clarify the vision for the Secretariat: Change requires a clearly articulated strategic vision from the secretary-general. Encourage support from member states: The secretary-general and other senior officials should engage member states in building a rationale for reform, as well as in developing concrete proposals. Tracking and making use of member states’ interests can help the Secretariat push a reform agenda. Involve the General Assembly: The General Assembly, through its president, should...

The UN Security Council in the 21st Century

Related Research The UN Security Council in the 21st Century  By Sebastian von Einsiedel, David M. Malone, and Bruno Stagno Ugarte, editors After grappling for two decades with the realities of the post–Cold War era, the UN Security Council must now meet the challenges of a resurgence of great power rivalry. Reflecting this new environment, The UN Security Council in the 21st Century provides a comprehensive view of the council’s internal dynamics, its role and relevance in world politics, and its performance in addressing today’s major security challenges. View the book here.   <...

The Oxford Handbook of United Nations Peacekeeping Operations, edited by Joachim Koops, Norrie MacQueen, Thierry Tardy, and Paul D. Williams

Related Research The Oxford Handbook of United Nations Peacekeeping Operations Edited by Joachim Koops, Norrie MacQueen, Thierry Tardy, and Paul D. Williams The Oxford Handbook of United Nations Peacekeeping Operations provides an innovative, authoritative, and accessible examination and critique of all 67 United Nations peacekeeping operations launched between 1948 and 2013. l Since the late 1940s, but particularly since the end of the cold war, peacekeeping has been the most visible and one of the most important activities of the United Nations and a significant part of global security governance and conflict management. The volume offers a chapter-by-chapter chronological analysis, designed to provide a comprehensive overview that highlights the evolution, changing nature and overall impact of UN peacekeeping. It also includes a collection of thematic chapters that examine key issues such as major trends of peace operations, the link between peacekeeping, humanitarian interventions and the responsibility to protect, peacekeeping and international law, the UN’s inter-organizational partnerships and how to evaluate success or failure. l This handbook brings together leading scholars and senior practitioners in order to provide a comprehensive assessment of the successes, failures and lessons learned of UN peacekeeping since 1948. This is a unique reference book for scholars and practitioners working in the field of international relations, international security, peacekeeping and global governance. View book here <...

The UN at War: Examining the Consequences of Peace-Enforcement Mandates for the UN Peacekeeping Operations in the CAR, the DRC and Mali

Related Research The UN at War: Examining the Consequences of Peace-Enforcement Mandates for the UN Peacekeeping Operations in the CAR, the DRC and Mali By John Karlsrud The UN peacekeeping operations in the Central African Republic (CAR), Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Mali were in 2013 given peace enforcement mandates, ordering them to use all necessary measures to ‘neutralise’ and ‘disarm’ identified groups in the eastern DRC and to ‘stabilise’ CAR and northern Mali. It is not new that UN missions have mandates authorising the use of force, but these have normally not specified enemies and have been of short duration. This article investigates these missions to better understand the short- and long-term consequences, in terms of the willingness of traditional as well as Western troop contributors to provide troops, and of the perception of the missions by host states, neighbouring states, rebel groups, and humanitarian and human rights actors. The paper explores normative, security and legitimacy implications of the expanded will of the UN to use force in peacekeeping operations. It argues that the urge to equip UN peacekeeping operations with enforcement mandates that target particular groups has significant long-term implications for the UN and its role as an impartial arbitrator in post-conflict countries. Read the article here <...
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