Deploying Combined Teams: Lessons Learned from Operational Partnerships in UN Peacekeeping

Related Research Deploying Combined Teams: Lessons Learned from Operational Partnerships in UN Peacekeeping By Donald C. F. Daniel, Paul D. Williams, and Adam C. Smith The 12th Report in the Providing for Peacekeeping series Only fifteen United Nations’ member states provide more than 60 percent of the 104,000 UN uniformed personnel deployed worldwide. How can a more equitable sharing of the global peacekeeping burden be produced that generates new capabilities for UN operations? Operational partnerships are one potentially useful mechanism to further this agenda. They are partnerships that occur when military units from two or more countries combine to deploy as part of a peacekeeping operation. This report assesses the major benefits and challenges of these partnerships for UN peace operations at both the political and operational levels. The report begins by providing an overview of the different varieties of partnerships in contemporary UN peace operations and describes the major patterns apparent in a new database of forty-one operational partnerships from 2004 to 2014. It presents case studies of two UN missions that exhibit the full range of operational partnerships: the UN Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) and the UN Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP). The authors explore why some UN member states engage in operational partnerships or might do so in the future, arguing that the reasons include a wide range of both mission-specific concerns and broader political and security-related reasons. Download the report here <...

Europe’s Return to UN Peacekeeping in Africa? Lessons from Mali

Related Research Europe’s Return to UN Peacekeeping in Africa? Lessons from Mali By John Karlsrud and Adam C. Smith The 11th Report in the Providing for Peacekeeping series In a break from recent tradition, European member states are currently contributing significant military capabilities to a United Nations (UN) peacekeeping operation in Africa. Europeans are providing more than 1,000 troops to the UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) by staffing a wide range of operations including an intelligence fusion cell, transport and attack aircraft, and special forces. Yet for European troop-contributing countries (TCCs) that have spent several years working in North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) operations in Afghanistan, participating in a UN mission has been a process of learning and adaptation. For the UN, the contributions of key capabilities by European countries have pushed the UN system to adjust to the higher expectations of the new European TCCs, which has proved difficult in Mali’s complicated operating environment and political situation. The report examines this complex relationship and shows the challenges and opportunities for both the UN and its European member states participating in MINUSMA. In terms of challenges, the report identifies obstacles facing European TCCs as they adapt to the UN peacekeeping system, the domestic political concerns of European TCCs, and the need for increased partnership among TCCs within the mission. In terms of opportunities, the report finds the potential of European military contributions to strengthen UN peacekeeping operations facing capability constraints and the UN’s ability to learn and adjust to increasingly asymmetric threat environments, as it responds to the needs of European TCCs. Download the report here....

Improving United Nations Capacity for Rapid Deployment

Related Research Improving United Nations Capacity for Rapid Deployment By H. Peter Langille The 8th report in the Providing for Peacekeeping series Too many conflicts over the past twenty years—from Rwanda to the Central African Republic—have demonstrated that the costs of intervening in a crisis increase dramatically when deployments of peace operations are delayed. With slow responses, violent conflicts tend to escalate and spread, increasing destruction and suffering, as well as the need for later, larger, and longer operations at higher costs. This report assesses the UN’s capacity to rapidly deploy large peace operations by evaluating eight initiatives designed to reach this goal. It proposes the establishment of a UN “early mission headquarters” tool to expedite mission start-up and explores potentially promising partnerships for rapid deployment underway in Africa, Europe, and Latin America. The author finds that attempts to develop better arrangements for rapid deployment have been repeatedly frustrated by financial austerity and an approach that encourages incremental, fragmented reforms, which have proven insufficient. Despite previously recommended response times of thirty to ninety days, UN deployments now tend to require six to twelve months. Download the report here <...

Not Just a Numbers Game: Increasing Women’s Participation in UN Peacekeeping

Related Research Not Just a Numbers Game: Increasing Women’s Participation in UN Peacekeeping By Sahana Dharmapuri The 4th report in the Providing for Peacekeeping series This paper argues that the focus on increasing the numbers of female uniformed personnel has obscured the equally important goal of integrating a gender perspective into the work of peace operations. Both goals have gone unmet due to three core issues: the lack of understanding about SCR 1325 and the UN policy on gender equality in peace operations; a gap in data and analysis about women’s participation in national security institutions globally and in UN peacekeeping in particular; and the prevalence of social norms and biases which promote gender inequality within the security sector. Download the paper here <...

Trends in Uniformed Contributions to UN Peacekeeping: A New Dataset, 1991-2012

Related Research Trends in Uniformed Contributions to UN Peacekeeping: A New Dataset, 1991-2012 Chris Perry and Adam C. Smith This is the 3rd report in the Providing for Peacekeeping series This brief paper describes the IPI Peacekeeping Database, relates a number of key findings from the data regarding overall trends in uniformed contributions to UN peacekeeping, and offers suggestions for future research using the data.  Among the key findings, the authors show that despite an increase in the number of countries contributing uniformed personnel to UN peacekeeping since 1990, contributions have become much less equally distributed. That is, there was a strong shift toward relatively fewer countries providing a relatively higher share of the total number of UN peacekeepers. This brief paper describes the IPI Peacekeeping Database, relates a number of key findings from the data regarding overall trends in uniformed contributions to UN peacekeeping, and offers suggestions for future research using the data.  Among the key findings, the authors show that despite an increase in the number of countries contributing uniformed personnel to UN peacekeeping since 1990, contributions have become much less equally distributed. That is, there was a strong shift toward relatively fewer countries providing a relatively higher share of the total number of UN peacekeepers. Download report here <...
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