Prioritizing the Protection of Civilians in UN Peace Operations: Analyzing the Recommendations of the HIPPO Report

Related Research Prioritizing the Protection of Civilians in UN Peace Operations: Analyzing the Recommendations of the HIPPO Report By Aditi Gorur and Lisa Sharand Despite rhetoric and mandates that identify the protection of civilians as one of the highest priorities for U.N. peace operations, protection is often not treated as a priority on the ground. The report of the High-Level Independent Panel on U.N. Peace Operations (HIPPO), released in June 2015, observed a growing gap between what is expected of peace operations and what they have delivered – particularly in the area of protection. This report identifies and analyzes strategic-level recommendations in the HIPPO report that are critical to create conducive conditions for missions to prioritize the protection of civilians. These include the adoption of phased and sequenced mandates, the development of political strategies, the enhancement of mission planning and analysis, and the timely deployment of military, police, and civilian capacities. The report draws on research at U.N. headquarters and in the field to offer recommendations for the consideration of peace operations stakeholders, including U.N. member states, the U.N. Security Council, and the U.N. Secretariat, in order to prioritize the protection of civilians in peace operations. Download report here <...

The Future of African Peace Operations: Time to Adjust the Operational Design

Related Research The Future of African Peace Operations: Time to Adjust the Operational Design By Walter Lotze In 2015, the African Standby Force (ASF), a key component of the African Peace and Security Architecture (APSA) is meant to reach full operational capability. More than a decade ago, in line with the growing political ambitions of African states to play a stronger role in relation to peace and security on the continent, African Union (AU) members decided to establish their own rapidly deployable, multi-dimensional peace operations capability. Despite significant progress attained the development of the ASF has been uneven over the course of the past decade. Unsatisfied with these delays, African states through the African Union (AU) Assembly in 2013 mandated the establishment of the African Capacity for Immediate Response to Crises (ACIRC), intended to provide the AU with a quick reaction force, as a temporary stop-gap until the ASF was ready. Neither the ASF nor the ACIRC however will be able to provide Africa sufficiently with the peace support operations capabilities it requires. What is needed therefore is an adjustment of the operational design for African peace support operations which better corresponds to the realities and needs of the African continent. Download report here <...

Improving United Nations Capacity for Rapid Deployment

Related Research Improving United Nations Capacity for Rapid Deployment By H. Peter Langille The 8th report in the Providing for Peacekeeping series Too many conflicts over the past twenty years—from Rwanda to the Central African Republic—have demonstrated that the costs of intervening in a crisis increase dramatically when deployments of peace operations are delayed. With slow responses, violent conflicts tend to escalate and spread, increasing destruction and suffering, as well as the need for later, larger, and longer operations at higher costs. This report assesses the UN’s capacity to rapidly deploy large peace operations by evaluating eight initiatives designed to reach this goal. It proposes the establishment of a UN “early mission headquarters” tool to expedite mission start-up and explores potentially promising partnerships for rapid deployment underway in Africa, Europe, and Latin America. The author finds that attempts to develop better arrangements for rapid deployment have been repeatedly frustrated by financial austerity and an approach that encourages incremental, fragmented reforms, which have proven insufficient. Despite previously recommended response times of thirty to ninety days, UN deployments now tend to require six to twelve months. Download the report here <...
Bitnami